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Oggetto:
Oggetto:

Entangled Histories: India, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East

Oggetto:

Entangled Histories: India, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East

Oggetto:

Anno accademico 2020/2021

Codice attività didattica
STS0303
Docente
Prof. Lorenzo Kamel (Titolare del corso)
Corso di studio
laurea magistrale in Scienze storiche
Anno
1° anno, 2° anno
Periodo
Secondo semestre
Tipologia
Caratterizzante
Crediti/Valenza
12
SSD attività didattica
M-STO/04 - storia contemporanea
Erogazione
Mista
Lingua
Inglese
Frequenza
Facoltativa
Tipologia esame
Scritto
Prerequisiti
L'insegnamento sarà attivo dall'a.a. 2020-2021.
Oggetto:

Sommario del corso

Oggetto:

Obiettivi formativi

Ahead of the starting date of the course all registered students will receive a link via Webex. Through it they will be able to attend the lessons.

The course, held in English, is subdivided in 2 modules.

Module n. 1 consists of 12 lessons, 3 hours each.   

Module n. 2 consists of 12 lessons, 3 hours each.

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Module n. 1Entangled Histories: India, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East 

The first module will examine the contemporary history of non-European/American cultures and contexts. The first part will mainly focus on India and Africa (Sub-Saharan), and will provide the analytical, linguistic, and theoretical frame required to approach non-Western contexts. This conceptual background will be also discussed through specific case studies.

The second part of this module will focus on the contemporary history of the Middle East and North Africa, giving special attention to the crucial junctures of the region’s ‘long 19thcentury’, when exceptional circumstances worked to shape the region’s ethno-religious, political, economic and cultural dimensions.

Module n. 2: History of the Middle East and North Africa

The first part of the 2nd module (3 lessons) will provide an analytical overview of the Middle East and North Africa, particularly in relation to the phase in between the “long 19th century” and our days. To this end, a special attention will be given to the late Ottoman era, WWI and the inter-war period, as well as to the historical phase in between the end of WWII and the 1970s energy crisis.

The remaining lessons (9 lessons) will consist in an in-depth historical analysis focused on the following contexts: Iran, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Egypt, Iraq (including Iraqi Kurdistan), Israel, Palestine, Syria, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Libya

Overall, the 2nd module will analyze, among a number of other issues, the emergence of bottom-up grassroots ideas and local anti-colonial movements; the formation of modern nation states; the role of Islamic and non-Islamic groups in the “political reform processes”; the influence and legacy of long-standing regional conflicts; the (active) role of local women in pressure groups and political movements; the impact of colonialism and imperialism on the Middle East and North Africa; the lives of ordinary men and women in the late modern and contemporary era; the “Arab cold war”; the “revival of Islam” and the role of non-Muslim communities; and the rising regional orders in the 2000s and 2010s.

The course, held in English, is subdivided in 2 modules.

Module n. 1 consists of 12 lessons, 3 hours each. 

Module n. 2 consists of 12 lessons, 3 hours each.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module n. 1Entangled Histories: India, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East 

The first module will examine the contemporary history of non-European/American cultures and contexts. The first part will mainly focus on India and Africa (Sub-Saharan), and will provide the analytical, linguistic, and theoretical frame required to approach non-Western contexts. This conceptual background will be also discussed through specific case studies.

The second part of this module will focus on the contemporary history of the Middle East and North Africa, giving special attention to the crucial junctures of the region’s ‘long 19thcentury’, when exceptional circumstances worked to shape the region’s ethno-religious, political, economic and cultural dimensions.

Module n. 2: History of the Middle East and North Africa

The first part of the 2nd module (3 lessons) will provide an analytical overview of the Middle East and North Africa, particularly in relation to the phase in between the “long 19th century” and our days. To this end, a special attention will be given to the late Ottoman era, WWI and the inter-war period, as well as to the historical phase in between the end of WWII and the 1970s energy crisis.

The remaining lessons (9 lessons) will consist in an in-depth historical analysis focused on the following contexts: Iran, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Egypt, Iraq (including Iraqi Kurdistan), Israel, Palestine, Syria, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Libya

Overall, the 2nd module will analyze, among a number of other issues, the emergence of bottom-up grassroots ideas and local anti-colonial movements; the formation of modern nation states; the role of Islamic and non-Islamic groups in the “political reform processes”; the influence and legacy of long-standing regional conflicts; the (active) role of local women in pressure groups and political movements; the impact of colonialism and imperialism on the Middle East and North Africa; the lives of ordinary men and women in the late modern and contemporary era; the “Arab cold war”; the “revival of Islam” and the role of non-Muslim communities; and the rising regional orders in the 2000s and 2010s.

Oggetto:

Risultati dell'apprendimento attesi

By the end of the 1st module students should be able to:

-acquire a comparative understanding of late modern and contemporary history

-acquire a deeper understanding of concepts and approaches such as imperialism, colonialism, post-colonial theory, de-colonization, necro-politics

-become familiar with the impact of colonialism on national and non-national cultures

-get acquainted with contemporary issues that result from “racial”, “tribal”, ethnic, and religious identities

-acquire a gender understanding in relation to local responses to colonial rule.

-enhance their verbal presentation and written skills.

By the end of the 2nd module students should be able to:

-acquire an in-depth understanding of the history of some of the most important countries – and their inhabitants – in the Middle East and North Africa

-acquire a deeper and more informed knowledge of where to look for, and how to get, scholarships, grants, and research funds, for national and international projects or programs

-enhance their verbal presentation and written skills

By the end of the 1st module students should be able to:

-acquire a comparative understanding of late modern and contemporary history

-acquire a deeper understanding of concepts and approaches such as imperialism, colonialism, post-colonial theory, de-colonization, necro-politics

-become familiar with the impact of colonialism on national and non-national cultures

-get acquainted with contemporary issues that result from “racial”, “tribal”, ethnic, and religious identities

-acquire a gender understanding in relation to local responses to colonial rule.

-enhance their verbal presentation and written skills.

By the end of the 2nd module students should be able to:

-acquire an in-depth understanding of the history of some of the most relevant countries in the Middle East and North Africa

-acquire a deeper and more informed knowledge of where to look for, and how to get, scholarships, grants, and research funds, for national and international projects or programs

-enhance their verbal presentation and written skills

Oggetto:

Programma

Students will prepare the readings following the schedule which will be distributed at the beginning of the course. All teaching materials will be made available to students in a dedicated page on dropbox.

The following reading list is divided into 2 modules, 12 lessons each. Each lesson consists of 3 hours. 

Students are kindly requested to prepare the required readings carefully, in order to be able to participate to class discussions.

Additionally, each week one student (or a group of students, depending on the class size) will be asked to prepare a short oral presentation (about 12 minutes) on one source included in the reading list (see below). Students are prompted to think also about the context in which texts are produced, by whom and for whom they are written, and for which aim, and to assess their potential effects. The list of presentations will be agreed during the first lesson.

MATERIALS FOR MODULE n. 1:

Lesson 1: Overview of the course (presentation of the syllabus; audiovisual tools; hashtags; journals; archives) and preliminary inputs

Suggested reading: J. Osterhammel, Time: When Was the Nineteenth Century? (ch. 2 of J. Osterhammel, The Transformation of the World, Princeton University Press, Princeton 2014, ch. 2, and L. Hunt, Measuring Time, Making History, Central European University Press, Budapest 2008, ch. 3.

Lesson 2: The Age of Imperialism and Colonialism

Required reading: S. Beckert, Empire of Cotton, Random House, Toronto 2014, ch. 12

Presentation delivered by one student: D. Chakrabarty, The Climate of History, in “Critical Inquiry”, 35(2), Winter 2009, pp. 197-222. Or: J. Kalman, Competitive Imperialism in the Early Nineteenth-Century Mediterranean, in “The Historical Journal”, May 2020, pp. 1-20.

Lesson 3Identifying and discussing stereotypes on the Middle East, Africa, and beyond

Required reading: Required reading: S. Chan, Grasping Africa, IB Tauris, Londra 2008, chapter 3, and Wael B. Hallaq, Restating Orientalism: A Critique of Modern Knowledge, Columbia UP, New York 2018, ch. 1. 

Presentation delivered by one student: E. Said, Orientalism, Pantheon, New York 1978, Introduction & L. Kamel, The impact of “Biblical Orientalism”, «New Middle Eastern Studies», 4, 2014, pp. 1-15. Available on-line: http://www.brismes.ac.uk/nmes/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/NMES2014Kamel.pdf

Lesson 4: India, Africa and the Middle East: History in a Comparative Perspective

Required reading: P. Gopal, Insurgent Empire. Anticolonial Resistance and British Dissent, Verso, New York 2019, pp. 99-111.

Presentation delivered by one student: J.P. Daughton, An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism, and the Making of French Colonialism, 1880-1914, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2006, ch. 1. Or: M.L. Louro, Comrades against Imperialism: Nehru, India, and Internationalism, Cambridge UP, Cambridge 2018, ch. 2.

Lesson 5: The 'Jewel in the Crown': Approaching Modern India

Required reading: N. Ferguson, Empire, Basic Books, New York 2004, (only the conclusion). And: S. Tharor, Inglorious Empire, Scribe, London 2017, ch. 1.

Presentation delivered by one student: B. Gammerl, Subjects, Citizens, and Others, Berghahn, New York 2018, pp. 95-105. In alternative: R. Travers, Ideology and Empire in Eighteenth-Century India: The British Bengal, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2007, ch. 1.

Lesson 6: The “long-19th century” in Africa

Required reading: S. Press, Rogue Empires: Contracts and Conmen in Europe’s Scramble for Africa, Harvard University Press, Cambridge (MA) 2017, ch. 5.

J. Thornton, Precolonial African Industry and the Atlantic Trade, in “African Economic History”, n. 19, 1991, pp. 1-19. In alternative you can opt for the two chapters below: F. Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth, Grove Press, New York 1963, pp. 7-45. And: Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Something Torn and New: An African Renaissance, Basic Books, New York 2009, ch. 1.

Lesson 7: The Era of Transformation in the Ottoman Empire

Required reading: J. Clancy Smith, The Modern Middle East and North Africa: A History in Document, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2014, pp. 61-73.

Presentation delivered by one student: L. Kamel, From Empire to Sealed Identities, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh 2019, ch. 3.

Lesson 8: World War I in the Middle East: Shaping a New Order

Required reading: W. Cleveland, A History of the Modern Middle East, Westview Press, Boulder 2012, ch. 9.

Presentation delivered by one student: R.G. Suny, A History of the Armenian Genocide, Princeton UP, Princeton 2015, ch. 9.

Lesson 9: Competing Visions and Narratives: a Local-Global Conflict

Required reading: L. Kamel, Israel and a Palestinian State: Redrawing Lines? (ch. 7 of M. Beck, D. Jung, P. Seeberg, The Levant in Turmoil, Palgrave Macmillan, New York 2016).

Presentation delivered by one student: B. Bhandar, Colonial Lives of Property, Duke University Press, Durham 2018, ch. 3. Or: L. Kamel, Whose land? Land tenure in late 19th and early 20th century Palestine, «British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies», 41(2), 2014, pp. 230-242.

Lesson 10: The racialization of Nationalisms and the Struggle for Independence

Required reading: E.F. Thompson, How the West Stole Democracy from the Arabs: The Syrian Congress of 1920, Atlantic Monthly Press, New York 2020, pp. 208-221.

Presentation delivered by one student: S. Altorki (ed.), A Companion to the Anthropology of the Middle East, Wiley Blackwell, Chichester 2015, pp. 452-472.

Lesson 11: Stateless nations in the 19th and 20th centuries: the Kurdish case and beyond

Required reading: L. Kamel, From Pluralization to Fragmentation: The Kurdish Case from an Historical Perspective, «Nuova Rivista Storica», 103(1), Feb. 2019, pp. 251-266.

Presentation delivered by one student: E. Gareth Stanfield, M. Shareef (eds.), The Kurdish Question Revisited, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2017, ch. 4.

Lesson 12: Borders, States, Nations, and Minorities in the post-colonial spaces of the MENA region

Required reading: B. White, The Emergence of Minorities in the Middle East, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh 2011, introduction, and L. Kamel, The Middle East from Empire to Sealed Identities, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh 2019, chapter 1.

Presentation delivered by one student: U. Makdisi, The Problem of Sectarianism in the Middle East in an Age of Western Hegemony, in N. Hashemi-D. Postel (eds.), Sectarianization, Hurst, London 2017, chapter 1. 

 

MATERIALS FOR MODULE n. 2:

Lesson 1Setting the Stage

Suggested reading: J.L. Gelvin, The Modern Middle East, Oxford UP, Oxford 2011, chapter 4. And: L. Kamel, "Stabilising" the Middle East: A Historical Perspective, Istituto Affari Internazionali, March 2019, pp. 1-5, available on-line: https://www.iai.it/sites/default/files/iaicom1924.pdf

Lesson 2From the end of WWII to 1970s Oil Crisis: a Diacronic Overview

Required reading: J. Clancy Smith, The Modern Middle East and North Africa: A History in Document, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2014, pp. 203-237

Presentation delivered by one student: B.S. Anderson, A History of the Modern Middle East: Rulers, Rebels and Rogues, Stanford UP, Stanford 2016, chapter 6 (“Rebel and Rougues”)

Lesson 3The “Resurgence of Islam”: the Middle East and North Africa from the 1970s to the Present

Required reading: M. Kamrava, The Modern Middle East, University of California Press, Berkeley 2011, chapter 6 (“The Gulf Wars and Beyond”)

Presentation delivered by one student: K. Ghattas, Black Wave, Henry Holt, New York 2020, ch. 9 (“Mecca is mine”).

Lesson 4: Framing and Deconstructing “The Iranian Century”: the Rising of “Political Shiʿism”

Required reading: F. Bishara, The Many Voyages of Fateh Al-Khayr: Unfurling the Gulf in the Age of Oceanic History, in “International Journal of Middle East Studies”, Summer 2020, pp. 1-16, and: L. Kamel, Whose Stability? Assessing the ‘Iranian Threat’ through History, chapter 9 of: L. Kamel (ed.), The Middle East, Thinking About and Beyond Security and Stability, Peter Lang, Bern 2019.

Presentation delivered by one student: M.R. Kalantari, The Shi’i Clergy and perceived opportunity structures: political activism in Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon, in “British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies”, 2019, pp. 1-15. Or: M. Abedi, An Iranian Village Boyhood, chapter 16 of: E. Burke III (ed.), Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East, University of California Press, Berkeley 2006.

Lesson 5: “A House of Many Mansions”: the Past’s Present of Lebanon

Required reading: F. Trabulsi, A History of Modern Lebanon, Pluto Press, London 2007, chapter 6 (“From Mandate to Independence”).

Presentation delivered by one student: K. Salibi, A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered, I.B. Tauris, London 2002, chapter 11 (“The war over Lebanese history”). 

Lesson 6: Egypt: A Gender-Centered Historical Approach

Required reading: B.S. Anderson, A History of the Modern Middle East: Rulers, Rebels and Rogues, Stanford UP, Stanford 2016, pp. 612-637.

Presentation delivered by one student: L. Abu-Lughod, Migdim: Egyptian Bedouin Matriarch, chapter 14 of: E. Burke III (ed.), Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East, University of California Press, Berkeley 2006. 

Lesson 7: “Al-Marar al-Arabi”: Saudi Arabia between Past and Present

Required reading: J. Wynbrandt, A brief history of Saudi Arabia, Facts of File, New York 2010, chapter 9 (“Birth of a Kingdom”). Or: M. Al-Rasheed, A History of Saudi Arabia, Cambridge UP, Cambridge 2010, chapter 2.

Presentation delivered by one student: A Vassiliev, The history of Saudi Arabia, Saqi Books, London 1998, chapter 2 (“Mohammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab and his Teaching”) and G. Steinberg, Wahhabi ‘ulama and the state in Saudi Arabia, 1927(pp. 77-61), in C.M. Amin, The Modern Middle East, Oxford UP, Oxford 2006

Lesson 8: Zionism and the Birth of the State of Israel

Required reading: W. Cleveland, A History of the Modern Middle East, Westview Press, Boulder 2012, chapter 13 (“The Palestine Mandate and the Birth of the State of Israel”)

Presentation delivered by one student: D. Moses, Partitions, Hostages, Transfer, in A.M. Dubnov, L. Robson (eds.), Partitions, Stanford University Press, Stanford 2019, epilogue (pp. 257-295). Or: O. Bashkin, Impossible Exodus: Iraqi Jews in Israel, Stanford University Press, Stanford 2017, chapter 2 (“Children of Iraq, Children of Israel”).

Lesson 9: Palestine, between Ruptures and Continuities

Required reading: L. Kamel, Imperial Perceptions of Palestine: British Influence and Power in Late Ottoman Times, I.B. Tauris, New York and London 2015, chapter 2.

Presentation delivered by one student: L. Kamel, The impact of “Biblical Orientalism”, «New Middle Eastern Studies», 4, 2014, pp. 1-15. Or: L. Kamel, De-Threatenization of the Other. An Israeli and a Palestinian Case of Understanding the Other’s Sufferance, in “Peace and Change”, 37(3), 2012, pp. 366-388.

Lesson 10: Why Syria does not have an “Independence Day”?

Required reading: I. Ouahes, Syria and Lebanon under the French Mandate, I.B. Tauris, London and New York 2018, pp. 12-35.

Presentation delivered by one student: D. Lesch, Syria, Polity, Medford (MA) 2019, ch. 3 ("The French Mandate").

Lesson 11: “Al-Gharb”: Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco

Required reading: P.C. Naylor, North Africa, University of Texas Press, Austin 2009, chapter 6 (“European Colonialism in North Africa”) and R. Rouighi, How the West made Arabs and Berbers into Races, available on-line: https://aeon.co/essays/how-the-west-made-arabs-and-berbers-into-races

Presentation delivered by one student: M. Oualdi, A Slave between Empires, Columbia University Press, New York 2020, introduction, or: J. Mundy, The Geopolitical Functions of the Western Sahara Conflict, in R. Ojeda-Garcia et. al. (eds.), Global, Regional and Local Dimensions of Western Sahara’s Protracted Decolonization, Palgrave, New York 2017, ch. 3.

Lesson 12: The Libyan Case, and the Case for Libya

Required reading: D. Vandewalle, A History of Modern Libya, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2012, chapter 2 (“Italy’s Fourth Shore and Decolonization”)

Presentation delivered by one student: I. Fraihat, Unfinished Revolutions, Yale University Press, New Haven 2016, chapter 1 (“Libya”)

 

Students will prepare the readings following the schedule which will be distributed at the beginning of the course. All teaching materials will be made available to students in a dedicated page on dropbox.

The following reading list is divided into 2 modules, 12 lessons each. Each lesson consists of 3 hours. 

Students are kindly requested to prepare the required readings carefully, in order to be able to participate to class discussions.

Additionally, each week one student (or a group of students, depending on the class size) will be asked to prepare a short oral presentation (about 12 minutes) on one source included in the reading list (see below). Students are prompted to think also about the context in which texts are produced, by whom and for whom they are written, and for which aim, and to assess their potential effects. The list of presentations will be agreed during the first lesson.

 

MATERIALS FOR MODULE n. 1:

Lesson 1: Overview of the course (presentation of the syllabus; audiovisual tools; hashtags; journals; archives) and preliminary inputs

Suggested reading: J. Osterhammel, Time: When Was the Nineteenth Century? (ch. 2 of J. Osterhammel, The Transformation of the World, Princeton University Press, Princeton 2014, ch. 2, and L. Hunt, Measuring Time, Making History, Central European University Press, Budapest 2008, ch. 3.

Lesson 2: The Age of Imperialism and Colonialism

Required reading: S. Beckert, Empire of Cotton, Random House, Toronto 2014, ch. 12

Presentation delivered by one student: D. Chakrabarty, The Climate of History, in “Critical Inquiry”, 35(2), Winter 2009, pp. 197-222. Or: J. Kalman, Competitive Imperialism in the Early Nineteenth-Century Mediterranean, in “The Historical Journal”, May 2020, pp. 1-20.

Lesson 3Identifying and discussing stereotypes on the Middle East, Africa, and beyond

Required reading: Required reading: S. Chan, Grasping Africa, IB Tauris, Londra 2008, chapter 3, and Wael B. Hallaq, Restating Orientalism: A Critique of Modern Knowledge, Columbia UP, New York 2018, ch. 1. 

Presentation delivered by one student: E. Said, Orientalism, Pantheon, New York 1978, Introduction & L. Kamel, The impact of “Biblical Orientalism”, «New Middle Eastern Studies», 4, 2014, pp. 1-15. Available on-line: http://www.brismes.ac.uk/nmes/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/NMES2014Kamel.pdf

Lesson 4: India, Africa and the Middle East: History in a Comparative Perspective

Required reading: P. Gopal, Insurgent Empire. Anticolonial Resistance and British Dissent, Verso, New York 2019, pp. 99-111.

Presentation delivered by one student: J.P. Daughton, An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism, and the Making of French Colonialism, 1880-1914, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2006, ch. 1. Or: M.L. Louro, Comrades against Imperialism: Nehru, India, and Internationalism, Cambridge UP, Cambridge 2018, ch. 2.

Lesson 5: The 'Jewel in the Crown': Approaching Modern India

Required reading: N. Ferguson, Empire, Basic Books, New York 2004, (only the conclusion). And: S. Tharor, Inglorious Empire, Scribe, London 2017, ch. 1.

Presentation delivered by one student: B. Gammerl, Subjects, Citizens, and Others, Berghahn, New York 2018, pp. 95-105. In alternative: R. Travers, Ideology and Empire in Eighteenth-Century India: The British Bengal, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2007, ch. 1.

Lesson 6: The “long-19th century” in Africa

Required reading: S. Press, Rogue Empires: Contracts and Conmen in Europe’s Scramble for Africa, Harvard University Press, Cambridge (MA) 2017, ch. 5.

J. Thornton, Precolonial African Industry and the Atlantic Trade, in “African Economic History”, n. 19, 1991, pp. 1-19. In alternative you can opt for the two chapters below: F. Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth, Grove Press, New York 1963, pp. 7-45. And: Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Something Torn and New: An African Renaissance, Basic Books, New York 2009, ch. 1.

Lesson 7: The Era of Transformation in the Ottoman Empire

Required reading: J. Clancy Smith, The Modern Middle East and North Africa: A History in Document, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2014, pp. 61-73.

Presentation delivered by one student: L. Kamel, From Empire to Sealed Identities, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh 2019, ch. 3.

Lesson 8: World War I in the Middle East: Shaping a New Order

Required reading: W. Cleveland, A History of the Modern Middle East, Westview Press, Boulder 2012, ch. 9.

Presentation delivered by one student: R.G. Suny, A History of the Armenian Genocide, Princeton UP, Princeton 2015, ch. 9.

Lesson 9: Competing Visions and Narratives: a Local-Global Conflict

Required reading: L. Kamel, Israel and a Palestinian State: Redrawing Lines? (ch. 7 of M. Beck, D. Jung, P. Seeberg, The Levant in Turmoil, Palgrave Macmillan, New York 2016).

Presentation delivered by one student: B. Bhandar, Colonial Lives of Property, Duke University Press, Durham 2018, ch. 3. Or: L. Kamel, Whose land? Land tenure in late 19th and early 20th century Palestine, «British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies», 41(2), 2014, pp. 230-242.

Lesson 10: The racialization of Nationalisms and the Struggle for Independence

Required reading: E.F. Thompson, How the West Stole Democracy from the Arabs: The Syrian Congress of 1920, Atlantic Monthly Press, New York 2020, pp. 208-221.

Presentation delivered by one student: S. Altorki (ed.), A Companion to the Anthropology of the Middle East, Wiley Blackwell, Chichester 2015, pp. 452-472.

Lesson 11: Stateless nations in the 19th and 20th centuries: the Kurdish case and beyond

Required reading: L. Kamel, From Pluralization to Fragmentation: The Kurdish Case from an Historical Perspective, «Nuova Rivista Storica», 103(1), Feb. 2019, pp. 251-266.

Presentation delivered by one student: E. Gareth Stanfield, M. Shareef (eds.), The Kurdish Question Revisited, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2017, ch. 4.

Lesson 12: Borders, States, Nations, and Minorities in the post-colonial spaces of the MENA region

Required reading: B. White, The Emergence of Minorities in the Middle East, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh 2011, introduction, and L. Kamel, The Middle East from Empire to Sealed Identities, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh 2019, chapter 1.

Presentation delivered by one student: U. Makdisi, The Problem of Sectarianism in the Middle East in an Age of Western Hegemony, in N. Hashemi-D. Postel (eds.), Sectarianization, Hurst, London 2017, chapter 1. 

 

MATERIALS FOR MODULE n. 2:

Lesson 1Setting the Stage

Suggested reading: J.L. Gelvin, The Modern Middle East, Oxford UP, Oxford 2011, chapter 4. And: L. Kamel, "Stabilising" the Middle East: A Historical Perspective, Istituto Affari Internazionali, March 2019, pp. 1-5, available on-line: https://www.iai.it/sites/default/files/iaicom1924.pdf

Lesson 2From the end of WWII to 1970s Oil Crisis: a Diacronic Overview

Required reading: J. Clancy Smith, The Modern Middle East and North Africa: A History in Document, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2014, pp. 203-237

Presentation delivered by one student: B.S. Anderson, A History of the Modern Middle East: Rulers, Rebels and Rogues, Stanford UP, Stanford 2016, chapter 6 (“Rebel and Rougues”)

Lesson 3The “Resurgence of Islam”: the Middle East and North Africa from the 1970s to the Present

Required reading: M. Kamrava, The Modern Middle East, University of California Press, Berkeley 2011, chapter 6 (“The Gulf Wars and Beyond”)

Presentation delivered by one student: K. Ghattas, Black Wave, Henry Holt, New York 2020, ch. 9 (“Mecca is mine”).

Lesson 4: Framing and Deconstructing “The Iranian Century”: the Rising of “Political Shiʿism”

Required reading: F. Bishara, The Many Voyages of Fateh Al-Khayr: Unfurling the Gulf in the Age of Oceanic History, in “International Journal of Middle East Studies”, Summer 2020, pp. 1-16, and: L. Kamel, Whose Stability? Assessing the ‘Iranian Threat’ through History, chapter 9 of: L. Kamel (ed.), The Middle East, Thinking About and Beyond Security and Stability, Peter Lang, Bern 2019.

Presentation delivered by one student: M.R. Kalantari, The Shi’i Clergy and perceived opportunity structures: political activism in Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon, in “British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies”, 2019, pp. 1-15. Or: M. Abedi, An Iranian Village Boyhood, chapter 16 of: E. Burke III (ed.), Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East, University of California Press, Berkeley 2006.

Lesson 5: “A House of Many Mansions”: the Past’s Present of Lebanon

Required reading: F. Trabulsi, A History of Modern Lebanon, Pluto Press, London 2007, chapter 6 (“From Mandate to Independence”).

Presentation delivered by one student: K. Salibi, A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered, I.B. Tauris, London 2002, chapter 11 (“The war over Lebanese history”). 

Lesson 6: Egypt: A Gender-Centered Historical Approach

Required reading: B.S. Anderson, A History of the Modern Middle East: Rulers, Rebels and Rogues, Stanford UP, Stanford 2016, pp. 612-637.

Presentation delivered by one student: L. Abu-Lughod, Migdim: Egyptian Bedouin Matriarch, chapter 14 of: E. Burke III (ed.), Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East, University of California Press, Berkeley 2006. 

Lesson 7: “Al-Marar al-Arabi”: Saudi Arabia between Past and Present

Required reading: J. Wynbrandt, A brief history of Saudi Arabia, Facts of File, New York 2010, chapter 9 (“Birth of a Kingdom”). Or: M. Al-Rasheed, A History of Saudi Arabia, Cambridge UP, Cambridge 2010, chapter 2.

Presentation delivered by one student: A Vassiliev, The history of Saudi Arabia, Saqi Books, London 1998, chapter 2 (“Mohammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab and his Teaching”) and G. Steinberg, Wahhabi ‘ulama and the state in Saudi Arabia, 1927(pp. 77-61), in C.M. Amin, The Modern Middle East, Oxford UP, Oxford 2006

Lesson 8: Zionism and the Birth of the State of Israel

Required reading: W. Cleveland, A History of the Modern Middle East, Westview Press, Boulder 2012, chapter 13 (“The Palestine Mandate and the Birth of the State of Israel”)

Presentation delivered by one student: D. Moses, Partitions, Hostages, Transfer, in A.M. Dubnov, L. Robson (eds.), Partitions, Stanford University Press, Stanford 2019, epilogue (pp. 257-295). Or: O. Bashkin, Impossible Exodus: Iraqi Jews in Israel, Stanford University Press, Stanford 2017, chapter 2 (“Children of Iraq, Children of Israel”).

Lesson 9: Palestine, between Ruptures and Continuities

Required reading: L. Kamel, Imperial Perceptions of Palestine: British Influence and Power in Late Ottoman Times, I.B. Tauris, New York and London 2015, chapter 2.

Presentation delivered by one student: L. Kamel, The impact of “Biblical Orientalism”, «New Middle Eastern Studies», 4, 2014, pp. 1-15. Or: L. Kamel, De-Threatenization of the Other. An Israeli and a Palestinian Case of Understanding the Other’s Sufferance, in “Peace and Change”, 37(3), 2012, pp. 366-388.

Lesson 10: Why Syria does not have an “Independence Day”?

Required reading: I. Ouahes, Syria and Lebanon under the French Mandate, I.B. Tauris, London and New York 2018, pp. 12-35.

Presentation delivered by one student: D. Lesch, Syria, Polity, Medford (MA) 2019, ch. 3 ("The French Mandate").

Lesson 11: “Al-Gharb”: Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco

Required reading: P.C. Naylor, North Africa, University of Texas Press, Austin 2009, chapter 6 (“European Colonialism in North Africa”) and R. Rouighi, How the West made Arabs and Berbers into Races, available on-line: https://aeon.co/essays/how-the-west-made-arabs-and-berbers-into-races

Presentation delivered by one student: M. Oualdi, A Slave between Empires, Columbia University Press, New York 2020, introduction, or: J. Mundy, The Geopolitical Functions of the Western Sahara Conflict, in R. Ojeda-Garcia et. al. (eds.), Global, Regional and Local Dimensions of Western Sahara’s Protracted Decolonization, Palgrave, New York 2017, ch. 3.

Lesson 12: The Libyan Case, and the Case for Libya

Required reading: D. Vandewalle, A History of Modern Libya, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2012, chapter 2 (“Italy’s Fourth Shore and Decolonization”)

Presentation delivered by one student: I. Fraihat, Unfinished Revolutions, Yale University Press, New Haven 2016, chapter 1 (“Libya”)

Oggetto:

Modalità di insegnamento

Frontal lectures, students' presentations, use of media, class discussion.

Students’ presentations should be organized in the following way: 1) present the thesis that the reading proposes; 2) summarize the main arguments used by the author to support the thesis; 3) present your comments on the article; 4) raise a number of questions to be discussed in class.

Frontal lectures, students' presentations, use of media, class discussion.

Students’ presentations should be organized in the following way: 1) present the thesis that the reading proposes; 2) summarize the main arguments used by the author to support the thesis; 3) present your comments on the article; 4) raise a number of questions to be discussed in class.

Oggetto:

Modalità di verifica dell'apprendimento

Grading

Grades in this course will be based on the following assignments:

Class participation 40%

Oral presentations 20%

Final examination 40%

 

Grading criteria for participation:

  • Demonstration of reading assigned materials prior to class
  • Contribution to discussion
  • Ability to critically analyze the readings

 

Grading criteria for oral presentation:

  • Well-organized and clear structure (the presentation has a clear Intro, body, and conclusion)
  • Demonstration of understanding the main ideas/thesis that the article intends to propose
  • Raise critical comments to readings
  • Raise questions to be discussed in the class

 

Grading criteria for final exam:

  • 8 multiple choice & 8 open questions: all taken only from the required readings

Grading

Grades in this course will be based on the following assignments:

Class participation 40%

Oral presentations 20%

Final examination 40%

 

Grading criteria for participation:

  • Demonstration of reading assigned materials prior to class
  • Contribution to discussion
  • Ability to critically analyze the readings

Grading criteria for oral presentation:

  • Well-organized and clear structure (the presentation has a clear Intro, body, and conclusion)
  • Demonstration of understanding the main ideas/thesis that the article intends to propose
  • Raise critical comments to readings
  • Raise questions to be discussed in the class

Grading criteria for final exam:

  • 8 multiple choice & 8 open questions: all taken only from the required readings

Oggetto:

Testi consigliati e bibliografia

The required readings of the course are listed in the program above.

 

The required readings of the course are listed in the program above.

Oggetto:

Note

Studentesse/studenti che frequenteranno il corso via Webex

L’intero insegnamento è erogato in diretta streaming via Webex senza registrazione e condivisione nella piattaforma Moodle. Qualora l’attività in sede sia realizzabile saranno calendarizzati momenti di interazione in presenza (collegiali, a piccoli gruppi o individuali).

Studentesse/studenti che non frequenteranno le lezioni via Webex

Per chi non potesse frequentare online le lezioni nell’orario stabilito saranno condivisi, sempre attraverso Webex, audio-presentazioni relative agli argomenti essenziali affrontati a lezione. Ad ogni lezione corrisponderà almeno un’audio-presentazione oltre al materiale didattico messo a disposizione.

Le studentesse e gli studenti che non parteciperanno alle lezioni streaming via Webex non potranno dimostrare la propria “partecipazione attiva” (corrispondente al 40% del voto finale), né effettuare alcuna presentazione (corrispondente al 20% del voto finale). Per ovviare a ciò, coloro che non parteciperanno alle lezioni streaming dovranno studiare, in aggiunta ai “required readings” assegnati e alle audio-presentazioni, 2 volumi tra quelli presenti nella lista qui in fondo. Lo studio dei due volumi in oggetto sarà appurata tramite un esame orale. La media del voto dell’esame orale sarà ponderata con l’esito dell’esame scritto basato sui “required readings" settimanali.

S. Beckert, Empire of Cotton, Random House, Toronto 2014.

J.D., Popkin, Haiti. Storia di una rivoluzione, Einaudi, Torino, 2020.

S. Press, Rogue Empires: Contracts and Conmen in Europe’s Scramble for Africa, Harvard University Press, Cambridge (MA) 2017.

L. Kamel, The Middle East from Empire to Sealed Identities, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh 2019.

Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Something Torn and New: An African Renaissance, Basic Books, New York 2009.

S. Yahya-Othman, Development as Rebellion: A Biography of Julius Nyerere, v. 1, Mkuki na Nyota, Dar es-Salaam 2020.

L. Kamel, Imperial Perceptions of Palestine: British Influence and Power in Late Ottoman Times, I.B. Tauris, Londra 2015.

P. Gopal, Insurgent Empire. Anticolonial Resistance and British Dissent, Verso, New York 2019.

U. Makdisi, Age of Coexistence: The Ecumenical Frame and the Making of the Modern Arab World, University of California Press, Oakland 2019.

 

For students who will attend the course via Webex  

The entire course will be delivered in live streaming via Webex. Lessons will neither be registered nor shared on the Moodle platform. Meetings in presence (small groups or individuals) will be organized if the conditions will allow.  

 

For students who will not attend lessons via Webex  

Students who won't attend the course via Webex at the scheduled time will have the chance to access registered audio-lessons (through Webex) that will include the essential topics covered in class. Students who won't attend the course via Webex will not be able to demonstrate their "active participation” (corresponding to 40% of the final grade), nor to deliver their oral presentations (corresponding to 20% of the final grade). In order to compensate this, students who won't attend the course via Webex are required to study both the “required readings” (and the related audio-lessons) listed in the syllabus, and 2 among the 8 books listed below, and to prepare for a final oral exam.
The final vote for the students who won't attend the course via Webex will consist of a weighted average between the oral exam (on the 2 books) and the final written exam (based on the “required readings” listed in the syllabus and the related audio lessons).
 
 
S. Beckert, Empire of Cotton, Random House, Toronto 2014.
 
J.D., Popkin, Haiti. Storia di una rivoluzione, Einaudi, Torino, 2020.
 
S. Press, Rogue Empires: Contracts and Conmen in Europe’s Scramble for Africa, Harvard University Press, Cambridge (MA) 2017.
 
L. Kamel, The Middle East from Empire to Sealed Identities, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh 2019.
 
Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Something Torn and New: An African Renaissance, Basic Books, New York 2009.
 
S. Yahya-Othman, Development as Rebellion: A Biography of Julius Nyerere, v. 1, Mkuki na Nyota, Dar es-Salaam 2020.
 
L. Kamel, Imperial Perceptions of Palestine: British Influence and Power in Late Ottoman Times, I.B. Tauris, Londra 2015.
 
P. Gopal, Insurgent Empire. Anticolonial Resistance and British Dissent, Verso, New York 2019.
 
U. Makdisi, Age of Coexistence: The Ecumenical Frame and the Making of the Modern Arab World, University of California Press, Oakland 2019.

Oggetto:

Corsi che mutuano questo insegnamento

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